Mario

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So far Mario has created 85 blog entries.

Teaching Kids to Swim

By | 2017-05-18T15:30:02+00:00 July 10th, 2010|Learning, NDPA, Water Safety|

In recent years, I've gotten hundreds of requests for information and advice about when children should start swimming lessons. Though I'd like to think I am a pretty smart guy, my experience in water safety [...]

Speaking of Drowning

By | 2017-05-18T15:30:02+00:00 July 9th, 2010|Water Safety|

The reaction to an article posted at gCaptain and again here on this site has been just this side of overwhelming.  I'd like to thank everyone who reposted - RT'd - shared - and liked [...]

Verdrinking lijkt niet op verdrinking

By | 2017-05-18T15:30:02+00:00 July 7th, 2010|Water Safety|

Translations: –English -  汉语 - tiếng Việt – Español – Italiano -  Français – Português – română – Deutsch – Suomi – Svenska -  Čeština – Русско -Íslenska – Audio Version De nieuwe kapitein sprong [...]

Expect the Unexpected

By | 2017-05-18T15:30:02+00:00 June 16th, 2010|Boating Safety, SAR, Survival|

The best place for boaters to be when heavy weather strikes is back at the marina – but weather changes can happen fast, the unexpected can extend your voyage, and in the middle of your first bad patch of sea is not the time or place to learn how to handle things in rough water.

Life and Death and Abby’s EPIRBs

By | 2017-05-18T15:30:02+00:00 June 12th, 2010|Boating Safety, EPIRB, SAR|

There is simply no way to imagine that the Sunderland's decision to allow their sixteen-year-old daughter (and seventeen-year-old son before her) to venture out to sea alone was not influenced by the modern EPIRB. She was carrying two of them aboard. "Radio's - check; SATCOM - check; Way to pinpoint your location and call for help if things go wrong? - check and check." The electronic "Time-Out" button provides a LOT of comfort to all of us who go to sea and I'm certainly not complaining; again, I love the things. However, mariners need to address the growing and unspoken trend to rely on these devices as a replacement for an abundance of caution and judgment.

Drowning Doesn’t Look Like Drowning

By | 2017-05-18T15:30:02+00:00 May 18th, 2010|gCaptain, Water Safety|

So if a crew member falls overboard and every looks O.K. - don't be too sure. Sometimes the most common indication that someone is drowning is that they don't look like they're drowning. They may just look like they are treading water and looking up at the deck. One way to be sure? Ask them: "Are you alright?" If they can answer at all - they probably are. If they return a blank stare - you may have less than 30 seconds to get to them. And parents: children playing in the water make noise. When they get quiet, you get to them and find out why.